August 20, 2014
understanding stress
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type a & b behavior patterns
biofeedback training & relaxation
thinking differently
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stress definition and theory

common symptoms of distress

life events questionnaire

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life events questionnaire  



The following step in the system to Systematic Stress Management is the Identification of Personal Stressors. A stressor is anything that produces stress. It can be a major life event , a situation, an object, or a thought that will cause the stress response to occur in the body.




Is there a connection between the number of major life events a person experiences in a year and the likelihood of illness? Drs. Thomas Holmes and Richard Rahe think so. They reached this conclusion after questioning 7,000 people about the number of life events they went through in one year. The people who scored highest on this questionnaire experienced the highest amount of physical illness in the year following the test. This would make sense if change places demand upon the body causing stress. As seen in the stress quotient, the body requires rest or diversion. Without it, illness or accident can result.




Instructions: Place a check mark in the column labeled "Happened" for those events that occurred in the past 12 months. Then record your score with the event value for each. Total the score.
Event
Rank
Event
Value
Happened Your
Score
Life Event
1 100
Death of a spouse
2 73
Divorce
3 65
Marital separation
4 63
Detention in jail or other institution
5 63
Death of close family member
6 53
Major personal injury or illness
7 50
Marriage
8 47
Being fired at work
9 45
Marital reconciliation
10 45
Retirement from work
11 44
Major change in the health or behavior of a family member
12 40
Pregnancy
13 40
Sex difficulty
14 39
Gaining a new family member through birth, adoption or remarriage
15 39
Major business readjustments
16 38
Major change in financial state
17 37
Death of close friend
18 36
Change to a different line of work
19 35
Major increase in the number of arguments with spouse
20 31
Taking on a mortgage
21 30
Foreclosure on a mortgage or loan
22 29
Major change in responsibilities at work (promotion, demotion, transfer)
23 29
Son or daughter leaving home
24 29
In-laws trouble
25 28
Outstanding personal achievement
26 26
Spouse beginning or ceasing work outside the home
27 26
Going back to school
28 25
Major change in living condition (building, remodeling or deterioration of home
29 24
Revision of personal habits
30 23
Troubles with supervisor, boss, or superiors
31 20
Major change in working hours or conditions
32 20
Change in residence
33 20
Change to a new school
34 19
Major change in type or amount of recreation
35 19
Major change in church activities
36 18
Major change in social activities
37 17
Purchase of a car or other big purchase
38 16
Major change in sleeping habits
39 15
Major change in the number of family get-togethers
40 15
Major change in eating habits
41 13
Vacation
42 12
Christmas or holiday observances
43 11
Minor violations of the law (traffic tickets)

Your Score: __________________

Scoring

  • People who score between 100-199 have a very mild risk of developing physical illness in the next year.
  • People who score between 200-299 have a more moderate risk of developing physical illness in the next 12 months.
  • People who score 300 or more have a strong risk of developing physical illness in the next 12 months.

    Note: These scores only represent a likelihood and not a definitive prediction.




Suggestions for Coping with Major Life Events
  1. Think about how many life event changes are taking place within a year or less!
  2. Notice the symptoms of distress from your body, mind and behavior.
  3. Practice diversion and rest.
  4. Decide to limit the number of changes when indicated.


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understanding stress
stress management at work
type a & b behavior patterns
biofeedback training & relaxation
thinking differently
communication and stress
time management
 
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